Food Allergy

En PB Clinical estamos especializados en Alergias Alimentarias en Barcelona

Today Food Allergies are more common than ever because many foods come to us genetically modified or with additives that provoke adverse reactions known as food intolerance. That’s why at PB Clinical we use the most advanced technology to deliver an exhaustive evaluation, and afterwards treat any allergy found with the objective of restoring the patient to health.

Is there a difference between a food allergy and a food intolerance?

A food allergy is produced by an immune reaction to a food. If a person eats hazelnuts and subsequently has a breakout of hives (welts on the skin) accompanied by a swelling of the lips, these are clear symptoms of a food allergy. By contrast, a food intolerance is produced when a person ingests a substance and presents symptoms that are not the result of immunological mechanisms. For example, people who are intolerant to gluten (celiacs), have a metabolism problem that prevents them from correctly digesting gluten.

Are fish allergy and anisakiasis the same thing?

Fish allergy and anisakiasis are two different things, although they have one thing in common: fish. Fish allergy is a type of food allergy produced when the body comes in contact with the food and subsequently develops antibodies against fish at the next exposure. By contrast, Anisakis Simplex is a parasite that infects fish and anisakiasis is an allergy to this specific parasite.

 

Can I develop a food allergy as an adult?

Food allergy can present at any stage of life. Every day, through unknown mechanisms, the body generates antibodies to common foods, but that day nothing happens. However, later on, when the body comes into contact with these same foods again, the organism presents symptoms in connection with this substance. And that is how an allergy develops to a food.

Fruit allergy: can you be allergic to a number of fruits?

Fruit allergy is the cause of many consultations. They present a relatively high degree of cross-reactivity. In this case, contact with a specific fruit allergen produces an initial immune response that, with subsequent exposures to other fruit, produces more allergy. For example, a person who is allergic to peach is often also allergic to other fruits such as apple, pear, melon, kiwi, or nuts.

Specialists in clinical immunology and allergy treatment in Barcelona.